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How to convert flash Video to Apple iPod Touch?

Apple’s iPod is known as a portable MP3 player. But until the iPod Touch (which is the newest iPod models), iPod has developed a powerful mobile multimedia player. iPod Touch is clearly a good solution for video / audio playback. We first convert flash video to iPod Touch format. So, how to convert flash video to iPod Touch is a problem we have to face and solve. Here I only suggested AllPepole Video Converter.

How to convert flash Video to Apple iPod Touch?
Just to convert videos to iPod Touch, it is easy to control. And almost all share common step conversion software. Add and then start setting the profile. But there are some differences in the details of different converters. Here are the detailed steps.

Step 1: Download and run the software;
Step 2: Click “Add” to load the video file;
Step 3: Select the output target format;
Step 4: Click “Convert” to run the conversion process.

It is AllPepole professional video conversion software. It fully supports all Apple portable devices (iPad, iPod and iPhone). Software provides fast conversion speed video quality is good but it is very easy to use. It allows the user to adjust all basic video parameters (frame rate, resolution, video / audio bit rate …).

Then, AllPepole professional video conversion software is user-friendly and very easy to figure out how to convert flash video to iPod Touch.

Free download at app store:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/my-videoconverter-free/id850311564?mt=12

AllPepole is a terminal software manufacturer and vendor for against civilians! This high-tech software enterprise provides software products include media series, office series, mobile series, and enterprise services series. such as Media Player,Video Merger,Mobile Transfer,Video Converter, Photo Editor ,Video Cutter etc…
AllPepole is a terminal software manufacturer and vendor for against civilians! This high-tech software enterprise provides software products include media series, office series, mobile series, and enterprise services series. such as Media Player,Video Merger,Mobile Transfer,Video Converter, Photo Editor ,Video Cutter etc…

AllPepole is a terminal software manufacturer and vendor for against civilians! This high-tech software enterprise provides software products include media series, office series, mobile series, and enterprise services series. such as Media Player,Video Merger,Mobile Transfer,Video Converter, Photo Editor ,Video Cutter etc…

Sharing music, New York style
video software
Image by Ed Yourdon
I took this shot at the 72nd Street IRT station, while waiting for an uptown train to take me back up to 96th Street.

For some reason, it got lost in my photo archives for a couple months, so I’m only now getting around to uploading it.

I didn’t really look closely when I took the picture (from the other side of the subway tracks), but the five-pronged earphone-attachment gizmo is something I’ve never seen before.

I assume the iPhone (or iPod or whatever) is buried in the purse of the woman sitting on the left … but would you really want your five closest friends to be listening to the same music that you do?

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Whether you’re an amateur or professional photographer, it’s hard to walk around with a modern smartphone in your pocket, and not be tempted to use the built-in camera from time-to-time. Veteran photographers typically sneer at such behavior, and most will tell you that they can instantly recognize an iPhone photo, which they mentally reject as being unworthy of any serious attention.

After using many earlier models of smartphones over the past several years, I was inclined to agree; after all, I always (well, almost always) had a “real” camera in my pocket (or backpack or camera-bag), and it was always capable of taking a much better photographic image than the mediocre, grainy images shot with a camera-phone.

But still … there were a few occasions when I desperately wanted to capture some photo-worthy event taking place right in front of me, and inevitably it turned out to be the times when I did not have the “real” camera with me. Or I did have it, but it was buried somewhere in a bag, and I knew that the “event” would have disappeared by the time I found the “real" camera and turned it on. By contrast, the smart-phone was always in my pocket (along with my keys and my wallet, it’s one of the three things I consciously grab every time I walk out the door). And I often found that I could turn it on, point it at the photographic scene, and take the picture much faster than I could do the same thing with a “traditional” camera.

Meanwhile, smartphone cameras have gotten substantially better in the past few years, from a mechanical/hardware perspective; and the software “intelligence” controlling the camera has become amazingly sophisticated. It’s still not on the same level as a “professional” DSLR camera, but for a large majority of the “average” photographic situations we’re likely to encounter in the unplanned moments of our lives, it’s more and more likely to be “good enough.” The old adage of “the best camera is the one you have with you” is more and more relevant these days. For me, 90% of the success in taking a good photo is simply being in the right place at the right time, being aware that the “photo opportunity” is there, and having a camera — any camera — to take advantage of that opportunity. Only 10% of the time does it matter which camera I’m using, or what technical features I’ve managed to use.

And now, with the recent advent of the iPhone5s, there is one more improvement — which, as far as I can tell, simply does not exist in any of the “professional” cameras. You can take an unlimited number of “burst-mode” shots with the new iPhone, simply by keeping your finger on the shutter button; instead of being limited to just six (as a few of the DSLR cameras currently offer), you can take 10, 20, or even a hundred shots. And then — almost magically — the iPhone will show you which one or two of the large burst of photos was optimally sharp and clear. With a couple of clicks, you can then delete everything else, and retain only the very best one or two from the entire burst.

With that in mind, I’ve begun using my iPhone5s for more and more “everyday” photo situations out on the street. Since I’m typically photographing ordinary, mundane events, even the one or two “optimal” shots that the camera-phone retains might not be worth showing anyone else … so there is still a lot of pruning and editing to be done, and I’m lucky if 10% of those “optimal” shots are good enough to justify uploading to Flickr and sharing with the rest of the world. Still, it’s an enormous benefit to know that my editing work can begin with photos that are more-or-less “technically” adequate, and that I don’t have to waste even a second reviewing dozens of technically-mediocre shots that are fuzzy, or blurred.

Oh, yeah, one other minor benefit of the iPhone5s (and presumably most other current brands of smartphone): it automatically geotags every photo and video, without any special effort on the photographer’s part. Only one of my other big, fat cameras (the Sony Alpha SLT A65) has that feature, and I’ve noticed that almost none of the “new” mirrorless cameras have got a built-in GPS thingy that will perform the geotagging…

I’ve had my iPhone5s for a couple of months now, but I’ve only been using the “burst-mode” photography feature aggressively for the past couple of weeks. As a result, the initial batch of photos that I’m uploading are all taken in the greater-NYC area. But as time goes on, and as my normal travel routine takes me to other parts of the world, I hope to add more and more “everyday” scenes in cities that I might not have the opportunity to photograph in a “serious” way.

Stay tuned….

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